Category Archives: Calico

Personallity Profile – Dr. Cynthia Kenyon – Google Calico

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Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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Dr Kenyon’s work with C. elegans is my oldest memory of anti-aging related research. She has had a wonderful career and now works with what I consider a dream job. Googles Calico. Here is her bio straight from their website.

Dr Cynthia KenyonGoogle Calico Cynthia Kenyon, Ph.D.

Vice President, Aging Research

Cynthia Kenyon is one of the world’s foremost authorities on the molecular biology and genetics of aging and life extension. She is Calico’s vice president of aging research.

In 1993, Kenyon’s pioneering discovery that a single-gene mutation could double the lifespan of healthy, fertile C. elegans roundworms sparked an intensive study of the molecular biology of aging. Her findings showed that, contrary to popular belief, aging does not “just happen” in a completely haphazard way. Instead, the rate of aging is subject to genetic control: Animals (and likely people) contain regulatory proteins that affect aging by coordinating diverse collections of downstream genes that together protect and repair the cells and tissues. Kenyon’s findings have led to the realization that a universal hormone-signaling pathway influences the rate of aging in many species, including humans. She has identified many longevity genes and pathways, and her lab was the first to discover that neurons, and also the germ cells, can control the lifespan of the whole animal.

cynthia kenyon

Kenyon graduated valedictorian in chemistry from the University of Georgia in 1976. She received her Ph.D. from MIT in 1981 and was a postdoctoral fellow with Nobel laureate Sydney Brenner in Cambridge, England. In 1986 she joined the faculty of the University of California, San Francisco, where she became the Herb Boyer Distinguished Professor and an American Cancer Society Professor, before joining Calico in 2014. Kenyon is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and she is a former president of the Genetics Society of America. She has received many scientific honors and awards.

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BILLIONAIRE PETER THIEL INVESTS IN THE WAR ON AGING

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Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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Via Popular Science – Original Link Here

valentinarr via Getty Images

valentinarr via Getty Images

Earlier this year, Breakout Labs, the subsidiary organization created by PayPal co-and billionaire-investor Peter Thiel, announced a few select biotechnology startups that would receiving funding to further their ideas. Breakout Labs’ mission is to invest in companies that are looking to make “radical scientific advances” mainstream, essentially boosting the best underfunded inventions to the tune of up to $350,000 (plus consultation help from Breakout Labs).

Well, Breakout Labs is at again, announcing funding ventures for the second time this year. This time, the ideas range from adhesives that mimic the skin of geckos, low-cost sensors that can tell if food has gone bad, metals that repel water, and a mission to fight aging. The overarching trend in this announcement is funding advances in microstructure: three companies use mechanical innovation on a nanoscale to seemingly change the property of the material.

CyteGen

Google’s Calico Lab made headlines in 2013, when the company announced it was going to “cure death.” Now, Thiel is investing in a similar mission. CyteGen tackles aging from the perspective that aging is a holistic process, not specific deterioration of body parts.

“There is an assumption that aging necessarily brings the kind of physical and mental decline that results in Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and other diseases. Evidence indicates otherwise, which is what spurred us to launch CyteGen,” said George Ugras, co-founder and president of CyteGen.

While CyteGen has held their cards close in regards to technique, the team members from eight universities will focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The name, CyteGen, is a close parallel to the field of cytogenetics, which looks at chromosomal structure in individual cells.

Calico enters into agreement with the Buck Institute to conduct research into the biology of aging and to identify potential therapeutics for age-related diseases!!!!

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Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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Because OF-COURSE they did! It is with GREAT happiness I post today that the place I plan to apply for grad-school (via USC Davis) and the organization I would like to join for employment. Just partnered!!!

Google Calico Buck Institute b

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO AND NOVATO, Calif., April 28, 2015 –Calico, a company focused on aging research and therapeutics, NAC OSCE and the Buck Institute for Research on Aging have partnered to support research into longevity and age-related diseases. Financial terms have not been disclosed.

Under the agreement, Calico will have the opportunity to identify, fund and support innovative research, ranging from basic biology to potential therapies for age-related diseases. Calico has the option to obtain exclusive rights to discoveries made under research it supports. Additionally, Calico will establish and maintain certain science operations at the Buck.

“We are excited to forge this new partnership with Calico, which represents a unique way for academic researchers focused on aging and the biotech industry to work together,” said Brian K. Kennedy, PhD, Buck Institute President and CEO. “It’s a great partnership between two organizations aimed at helping people live longer healthier lives, and we look forward to collaborating with their team.”

Commented Hal Barron, President of Research and Development at Calico. “Given the Buck’s exclusive focus on aging, we believe that there’s great potential to increase our understanding of the biology of aging and to accelerate the translation of emerging insights into therapies to help patients with age-related diseases.”

About the Buck Institute for Research on Aging:

The Buck Institute is the U.S.’s first and the world’s foremost independent research organization devoted to Geroscience –the connection between normal aging and chronic disease. Based in Novato, CA, the Buck houses 21 independent laboratories and is dedicated to extending “healthspan,” the healthy years of human life by slowing the aging process. Buck scientists work in a uniquely collaborative environment involving laboratories studying the mechanisms of aging and those focused on specific diseases. Buck scientists strive to discover new ways of detecting, preventing and treating age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, cancer, cardiovascular disease, macular degeneration, osteoporosis, diabetes and stroke. In their collaborative research, they are supported by the most recent developments in genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics and stem cell technologies. For more information Visit www.thebuck.org

About Calico

Calico (Calico Life Sciences LLC) is a Google-founded research and development company whose mission is to harness advanced technologies to increase our understanding of the biology that controls lifespan. Calico will use that knowledge to devise interventions that enable people to lead longer and healthier lives. Visit www.calicolabs.com

 

RB2015 Rejuvenation Biotechnology Conference Aug 19-21

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Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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RB2015

WHO ATTENDS

  • Academic Researchers
  • Pharmaceutical and Biotech Industry
  • Undergrad, Graduate and Post Doctorial Students
  • Nonprofits
  • Regulatory
  • Investors
  • The General Public

WHY ATTEND

  • Focused tracks covering three key elements of successful drug development: clinical review, therapeutic approaches, industry and policy
  • In depth examination of advances in tissue engineering and gene therapy
  • More interactivity – 6 hours of interactive discussion sessions and 17 hours of networking
  • Jobs Board – review and share the expertise needs of the industry’s leading research and development organizers
  • Understand and shape the scientific and investment opportunities of the new Rejuvenation Biotechnology Industry
  • Extended poster sessions
  • Back by popular demand – our opening evening’s entertainment will be Hal Sparks – Comedian, Actor and Musician.

Google wants to use nanoparticles and wristwatch-sensors to detect cancer.

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Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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google cancer

From http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/google-embarks-ambitious-project-change-way-we-diagnose-diseases-cancer-0

Google’s continuing efforts to change the world are certainly commendable, to say the least. It’s revolutionized the internet and is in the process of developing a self-driving car and sending weather balloons into the sky to give remote areas access to the web. Now, it’s set on postponing death by changing the way we diagnose disease.

Announced on October 28 at the Wall Street Journal’s WSJD Live conference, Google X’s latest ambitious project involves developing a novel way to diagnose a variety of conditions, including cancer, at much earlier stages than is presently possible. The technology will have two main components: disease-detecting nanoparticles and a wearable sensor that’s much like a wrist watch.

The nanoparticles, which will be around one-thousandth the width of a red blood cell, will be designed in such a way that they stick to disease-specific molecules in the body. Readings of these nanoparticles will then be taken regularly throughout the day by the watch-like device using either light or radio waves. If successful, this early warning system has the potential to save many lives because it would mean that possibly fatal conditions can be picked up before they become too late to treat.

The nanoparticles that Google is hoping to develop are not a “one size fits all,” but rather a whole range of microscopic detectives that are designed to match different disease markers. Some could target cell surface proteins that are only expressed on cancerous cells, whereas others might pick up fatty plaques before they slough off from blood vessels, which could cause a stroke. The particles would also be magnetic so that they can be guided towards the magnet-bearing wrist device.

Once they reach the wrist vasculature, they inform the sensor of the results of the latest scour, which can be downloaded using software. Doctors can then be alerted of any significant changes in the individual’s biochemistry. The whole thing would also be non-invasive as the particles would be introduced by a pill, negating the need for the removal of blood or other bodily fluids.

“What we are trying to do is change medicine from reactive and transactional to proactive and preventative,” project leader Dr. Andrew Conrad told the BBC. “Nanoparticles… give you the ability to explore the body at a molecular and cellular level.”

While this all sounds great on paper, some issues with the idea have already been raised. The technology needs to be incredibly precise to avoid false positive results, which could lead to anxiety and unnecessary intervention. What’s more, if there is no treatment, would you really want to know if you had the condition?

Google has claimed that the technology could reach the market within the next five to seven years, but that seems a little fanciful as it’s still uncertain whether the whole thing is feasible. Furthermore, even if they do manage to perfect the nanoparticles, they’ll need to get FDA approval and conduct large clinical trials to prove that it’s safe and effective. However, their commitment and determination is laudable, and they’ve said that they won’t use the data for marketing, and will even license the technology to partners to manage.

“We are the inventors of the technology,” Conrad said, “but we have no intentions of commercializing it or monetizing it in that way.”

[Via The BBC, TNW, WSJ and The Verge]

Google’s Anti-Aging Health-Tech Spinoff, Calico, Now Has A Website

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Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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From

http://www.siliconbeat.com/2014/08/12/googles-anti-aging-health-tech-spinoff-calico-now-has-a-website/

It was almost a year ago that Google announced a health-tech spinoff with the ambitious goal of studying the aging process to extend human life. The company, dubbed Calico, has been in stealth mode ever since.

But now, at least, it has a website.

The site still doesn’t say much about the company, which Google CEO Larry Page has described as one of Google’s “moon shot” efforts to have a big impact on a big problem. But it does offer some tantalizing hints about the roster of talent that’s being assembled by Calico chief Art Levinson, who was formerly CEO at Genentech.

Calico

The list includes Hal Barron, former head of global product development and chief medical officer at biotech giant Hoffmann-La Roche, who is now Calico’s president for research and development. Princeton geneticist David Botstein is Calico’s chief scientific officer. Cancer researcher Robert L. Cohen is a “Calico fellow.”

And former UCSF biochemist Cynthia Kenyon – who’s described as “one of the world’s foremost authorities on the molecular biology and genetics of aging and life extension” – is Calico’s vice president for aging research.

The site doesn’t say much more, although it may eventually post job openings. Still, it offers this blurb:

“Calico is a research and development company whose mission is to harness advanced technologies to increase our understanding of the biology that controls lifespan. We will use that knowledge to devise interventions that enable people to lead longer and healthier lives. Executing on this mission will require an unprecedented level of interdisciplinary effort and a long-term focus for which funding is already in place.”
(Image from Calico website)