Category Archives: Film & TV

TV Show – Please Watch and Support Pure Genius on CBS

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
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Pure Genius on CBS stands for everything we stand for at MYLT. Initial ratings are poor, and I attribute this to the public’s understanding of the technology showcased. In the first 2 episodes every technology showcased is in real world development. True we do not yet have these treatments, but this is stemming from non-fiction, not fiction. A show like this in addition to being greatly entertaining, is a powerful tool to help the public understand the potential future of medicine and the importance of supporting the science and research behind it. It would be a huge shame for the show to be cancelled without a hearty run. It should be on all our viewing lists however short those lists maybe. Support MYLT, Support Pure Genius on CBS.

Pure Genuis Website

Thursdays 10/9c on CBS

 

Wow Awesome Older Fellow Sings Heavy Metal

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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I enjoyed this way more than you might think.   😉

Grandma experiences first roller coaster, probably not what you expected

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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grandma roller coaster

 

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Grandma Ria, aged 78, had never travelled on an aeroplane before. So before her first ever flight, to beat her fear she took to the sky on a rollercoaster. Anyone’s first rollercoaster ride can be a mixture of fear, nerves and excitement but for daredevil Ria, who is from the Netherlands, it seemed nothing but joy. Video footage shows the 78-year-old being tossed and turned as she screeches and screams round the track. As the ride slows down at the end, Ria composes herself to ask “is my hair still ok?” Report by Claire Lomas.

Bride and Grooms to be sneak peak at growing old together

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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growing old

Published on May 14, 2015

SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1Fgns1r
BTS w/ Blaine from Cut: http://bit.ly/1H4oqKZ

If you had a crystal ball and could gaze into the future, how would you feel seeing the love of your life as a 90-year-old? Cut offered a young couple about to say their vows the unique chance to do just that by aging them over 60 years with incredibly life-like makeup and prosthetics. We dare you not to tear up as they fall in love again and again.

Field Day is a place to meet and see the platform’s most inspired filmmakers, dynamic entertainers, and exciting personalities. Each week, one of these inspired creators tries something new and creates their own unique, imaginative, dream video. Whether they’re investigating far-off places, dancing with remote control cars, or stunt flying with Star Fox, you won’t want to miss these creators #HaveAFieldDay

SUBSCRIBE to FIELD DAY: http://bit.ly/1Fgns1r
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Field Day is produced in conjunction with YouTube and award-winning production company 1stAveMachine.
Check out 1stAveMachine: http://bit.ly/1stAveMachine

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Like Cut on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/CutFacebook

Watch More Field Day:
Vsauce Investigates World’s Smallest Town: http://bit.ly/1QKKcuo
Amymarie Gaertner Dances with 100’s of Mini Cars : http://bit.ly/PLAYAmyMarie
MatPat Tests Star Fox IRL: http://bit.ly/PLAYStarFoxIRL

Behind the scenes:
Cut on the amazing makeup artists who aged the couple: http://bit.ly/1H4oqKZ
Amymarie on the set of her 1st music video: http://bit.ly/1PHBhHH
MatPat on facing his fear of flying for the sake of science: http://bit.ly/1PHBta0
Vsauce’s Michael on the trek to Alaska: http://bit.ly/1EEkiB0

Joe Rogan Experience #638 – Aubrey de Grey

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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Joe Rogan Aubrey de Grey

Published on Apr 22, 2015

Aubrey de Grey is an English author and theoretician in the field of gerontology and the Chief Science Officer of the SENS Research Foundation. http://sens.org/

102 year old Dancer Sees Herself on Film for the First Time

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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For-the-first-time2

Alice Barker was a chorus line dancer during the Harlem Renaissance of the the 1930s and 40s. She danced at clubs such as The Apollo, Cotton Club, and Zanzibar Club, with legends including Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson.

Although she danced in numerous movies, commercials and TV shows, she had never seen any of them, and all of her photographs and memorabilia have been lost over the years.

With the help of Mark Cantor of http://jazz-on-film.com we finally our hands on three “Soundies” Alice appeared in, and were able to show them to her for the very first time. She had never seen herself in motion in her life!

If you’d like to send Alice fan mail we would love to see her get the adoration she deserves after so many years! (We’ll do our best to read some of your comments to her as well.):

Alice Barker
c/o Bishop Henry B. Hucles Episcopal Nursing Home
835 Herkimer Street
Brooklyn, NY11233

For more info about the dancers of the Harlem Renaissance, we recommend the lovely documentary “Been Rich All My Life” —several of the women in the film danced with Alice back in the day!

To clarify: We are just friends of Alice who made this video. I’m a volunteer who visits the home with my dog for pet therapy, and have known Alice for 8 years. The woman in the video is the a recreation leader at the home. This was filmed as an afterthought, and we’re so thrilled that it’s brought so much joy to everyone and attention to Alice, who is loving it! Thank you all!

Immortality Now! Episode 6 with Dr Norman Shealy

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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Dr Norman Shealy

Episode #6: Featuring Dr. Norman Shealy M.D., Ph.D.

Immortality Now! is a monthly 20-minute video webcast hosted by Dr. Ronald Klatz, President & Founder of the A4M. Dr. Klatz conducts probing on-camera interviews with the scientists, physicians, and corporate innovators who are leading the field of anti-aging industry.
Immortality Now! explores cutting-edge biomedical and scientific break-throughs that hold the promise of optimal health, wellness, and longevity.

In this episode of Immortality Now! host Dr. Ronald Klatz talks with renowned physician and scientist Dr. Norman Shealy, M.D., Ph.D., a leader in the fields of Preventative and Energy Medicine. Dr. Shealy, has authored 30 books including Life Beyond 100, 90 Days to Self Health, and Living Bliss. He is the head of The Shealy Institiue, respected world-wide for it’s innovative and successful rehabilitation approaches to pain and stress management.

Dr. Shealy talks about Energy Medicine as an alternative to surgery or pharmaceuticals. He discusses his Telomere Modification Program, Transcutaneous Acupuncture using essential oils, and the use of Cranial Electrical Stimulation along with Photo Stimulation to treat depression, anxiety and addiction.  This episode includes both an interview with Dr. Shealy, as well as highlights from his presentation at the A4M anti-aging conference in Las Vegas, NV.

Tune in to Immortality Now! each month here on WorldHealth.net, or visit our YouTube channel at: www.YouTube.com/A4Mpresents

hotze

Major funding for Immortality Now! is provided by Hotze Vitamins, now offering customized vitamin paks. For more information, go to: Client.HotzeVitamins.com.

Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ could boost search for new drugs

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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Eve Robotic Scientist

Original Source Here

Eve, an artificially-intelligent ‘robot scientist’ could make drug discovery faster and much cheaper.

Robot scientist Eve at work
Robot scientist Eve at work
A team from the Universities of Manchester, Cambridge and Aberystwyth has demonstrated the potential of artificial intelligence by using Eve to discover that a compound shown to have anti-cancer properties might also be used in the fight against malaria.Robot scientists are a natural extension of the trend of increased involvement of automation in science. They can automatically develop and test hypotheses to explain observations, run experiments using laboratory robotics, interpret the results to amend their hypotheses, and then repeat the cycle, automating high-throughput hypothesis-led research. Robot scientists are also well suited to recording scientific knowledge: as the experiments are conceived and executed automatically by computer, it is possible to completely capture and digitally curate all aspects of the scientific process.

In 2009, Adam, a robot scientist developed by researchers at the Universities of Aberystwyth and Cambridge, became the first machine to autonomously discover new scientific knowledge. The same team has now developed Eve, based at the University of Manchester, whose purpose is to speed up the drug discovery process and make it more economical. In the study published today, they describe how the robot can help identify promising new drug candidates for malaria and neglected tropical diseases such as African sleeping sickness and Chagas’ disease.

“Neglected tropical diseases are a scourge of humanity, infecting hundreds of millions of people, and killing millions of people every year,” says Professor Ross King, from the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology at the University of Manchester. “We know what causes these diseases and that we can, in theory, attack the parasites that cause them using small molecule drugs. But the cost and speed of drug discovery and the economic return make them unattractive to the pharmaceutical industry.

“Eve exploits its artificial intelligence to learn from early successes in her screens and select compounds that have a high probability of being active against the chosen drug target. A smart screening system, based on genetically engineered yeast, is used. This allows Eve to exclude compounds that are toxic to cells and select those that block the action of the parasite protein while leaving any equivalent human protein unscathed. This reduces the costs, uncertainty, and time involved in drug screening, and has the potential to improve the lives of millions of people worldwide.”

Eve is designed to automate early-stage drug design. First, she systematically tests each member from a large set of compounds in the standard brute-force way of conventional mass screening. The compounds are screened against assays (tests) designed to be automatically engineered, and can be generated much faster and more cheaply than the bespoke assays that are currently standard. This enables more types of assay to be applied, more efficient use of screening facilities to be made, and thereby increases the probability of a discovery within a given budget.

Eve’s robotic system is capable of screening over 10,000 compounds per day. However, while simple to automate, mass screening is still relatively slow and wasteful of resources as every compound in the library is tested. It is also unintelligent, as it makes no use of what is learnt during screening.

To improve this process, Eve selects at random a subset of the library to find compounds that pass the first assay; any ‘hits’ are re-tested multiple times to reduce the probability of false positives. Taking this set of confirmed hits, Eve uses statistics and machine learning to predict new structures that might score better against the assays. Although she currently does not have the ability to synthesise such compounds, future versions of the robot could potentially incorporate this feature.

Steve Oliver from the Cambridge Systems Biology Centre and the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Cambridge says: “Every industry now benefits from automation and science is no exception. Bringing in machine learning to make this process intelligent – rather than just a ‘brute force’ approach – could greatly speed up scientific progress and potentially reap huge rewards.”

To test the viability of the approach, the researchers developed assays targeting key molecules from parasites responsible for diseases such as malaria, Chagas’ disease and schistosomiasis and tested against these a library of approximately 1,500 clinically approved compounds. Through this, Eve showed that a compound that has previously been investigated as an anti-cancer drug inhibits a key molecule known as DHFR in the malaria parasite. Drugs that inhibit this molecule are currently routinely used to protect against malaria, and are given to over a million children; however, the emergence of strains of parasites resistant to existing drugs means that the search for new drugs is becoming increasingly more urgent.

“Despite extensive efforts, no one has been able to find a new antimalarial that targets DHFR and is able to pass clinical trials,” adds Professor Oliver. “Eve’s discovery could be even more significant than just demonstrating a new approach to drug discovery.”

The research was supported by the Biotechnology & Biological Sciences Research Council and the European Commission.

Notes for editors

Sam Wood

Media Relations Officer

University of Manchester

Tel: +44 (0)161 2758155

Mob: +44 (0)7886 473422

Email: samuel.wood@manchester.ac.uk

Reference

Williams, K. and Bilsland, E. et al. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases. Interface; 4 Feb 2015.

95 year old Charles Eugster sets new record in the 200 metres.

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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Charles

Why We Age – And How We Can Stop It

Jonathon Fulkerson
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Jonathon Fulkerson

Undergraduate at The University of Southern Indiana + More Years Less Tears + Your NeXt Computer
After 15+ years as an IT professional. Jonathon decided to return to school in hopes of one day troubleshooting the most universal problem effecting all. Death, pain, and suffering by aging. As an undergraduate he is currently performing research in Dr. Richard Bennetts lab at the University of Southern Indiana, as well as volunteering for various organizations including the Buck Institute for research on Aging.
Jonathon Fulkerson
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Scishow